Sweat Equity (noun)- sustained effort; hard work

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    I'm a school teacher who has a passion for strength and conditioning. Over the years I have gained knowledge from the books, but more importantly through life experience and continued learning. My passion has turned into a side business. I see my responsibility as: 1. developing my trainees' strength throughout the whole body, not parts and pieces, both physically and mentally, and 2. to educate people on proper, effective exercise. If you train with me you will not get a cheerleader, but you will get somebody who will push and encourage you so that you will attain your goals. If you want to whine and not work hard, then find another trainer. It doesn't matter if you are a middle aged housewife or a college athlete-I can get you where you want to go, but only if you want it! If you are interested in training or nutritional counseling to achieve your goals, then please get in touch. Progress, not perfection! -Sweat Equity
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Never, ever give up!!

The next time you find yourself struggling with a perceived slight or thinking you were dealt a bad hand, take a look. These individuals epitomize determination. You’re right, life’s not fair-just ask these people!

In 1993, Jim Valvano, hiding the immense effort it took to even get up to the stage, gave an impassioned speech that applies to more than just sports. To put his physical state in perspective, he died less than 2 months after this speech. I have included what has become the “legacy” and context of the speech below the video. The video is 11 minutes, but well worth watching.


Jim Valvano was diagnosed with bone cancer in June 1992. In July, he found out that it had metastasized. Shortly before his death, he spoke at the inaugural ESPY Awards, presented by ESPN, on March 3, 1993. While accepting the inaugural Arthur Ashe Courage and Humanitarian Award, he announced the creation of the “Jimmy V Foundation”, an organization dedicated to finding a cure for cancer. He announced that the foundation’s motto would be “Don’t give up. Don’t ever give up.” During his speech the teleprompter stated that he had 30 seconds left, to which Valvano responded, “They got that screen up there flashing 30 seconds, like I care about that screen. I got tumors all over my body and I’m worried about some guy in the back going 30 seconds.” His speech became legendary, and he closed the speech by saying, “Cancer can take away all of my physical abilities. It cannot touch my mind, it cannot touch my heart, and it cannot touch my soul. And those three things are going to carry on forever. I thank you and God bless you all.” One particularly poignant section of Valvano’s speech is as follows:
To me, there are three things we all should do every day. We should do this every day of our lives. Number one is laugh. You should laugh every day. Number two is think. You should spend some time in thought. And number three is, you should have your emotions moved to tears, could be happiness or joy. But think about it. If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that’s a full day. That’s a heck of a day. You do that seven days a week, you’re going to have something special.

Jim Valvano died less than two months after his famous ESPY speech and after a year-long battle with cancer.

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